Social Security Administration Buying Cheap, Stacking Deep

Posted: August 17, 2012 by ShortTimer in Government, Guns
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A day or so ago, the story of the Social Security Administration buying 174,000 rounds of .357 Sig ammo broke.  It broke a lot of places.  Interesting to note that .357 sig is called “high powered” in the title.  Should they buy underpowered ammo?

First the DHS needed 450 million rounds of ammunition, then the NOAA requested 46,000 rounds, now we’ve discovered an online request at FBO.Govcalling for 174,000 rounds of ammunition for the Social Security Administration (SSA).

The request actually calls for 174K .357 hollow points that arguably have as much stopping power as any bullet out there, and hollow points do as much damage to soft tissue as possible on top of that.

Social Security has some 290 investigators, who operate just like normal law enforcement, dealing with fraud and real criminals.  Their investigators are armed just like any other officers.  The story above notes silly things about JHP ammo without talking about why.

In law enforcement, you aren’t out there to kill the enemy.  You’re out there to stop an attack by an assailant if an apprehension goes wrong.  You need to stop the attack immediately, thus you need maximum energy transfer.  That’s why agencies use JHP ammo.  It punches holes that get bigger in people, and makes people stop what they’re doing and sit down to bleed and leave the LEO alone.  It’s also why concealed carry folks use JHP ammo – you want your mugger/rapist/would-be-murderer to sit down and rethink his decision.  Killing him may be a consequence, but if you kill him 5 minutes later, he has time to beat your skull in with a brick.

The Social Security Administration went out today and noted this:

As we said in a recent post, our office has criminal investigators, or special agents, who are responsible for investigating violations of the laws that govern SSA’s programs. Currently, about 295 special agents and supervisory special agents work in 66 offices across the United States.  These investigators have full law enforcement authority, including executing search warrants and making arrests.

Our investigators are similar to your State or local police officers. They use traditional investigative techniques, and they are armed when on official duty.

Media reports expressed concerns over the type of ammunition ordered. In fact, this type of ammunition is standard issue for many law enforcement agencies. OIG’s special agents use this ammunition during their mandatory quarterly firearms qualifications and other training sessions, to ensure agent and public safety. Additionally, the ammunition our agents use is the same type used at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center.

Our special agents need to be armed and trained appropriately. They not only investigate allegations of Social Security fraud, but they also are called to respond to threats against Social Security offices, employees, and customers.

This is a great response, and speaks well of the Social Security administration and that they would address a concern of the public.  Good on them.  When it comes to the numbers, go back and compare the numbers crunched here.  The order is a reasonable number, and again, the response speaks well of Social Security.

Too bad they’re a government-mandated ponzi scheme.

Comments
  1. […] has been asked and answered a few times.  I’ll go back to my original answer here.  And I addressed the Social Security Adminstration’s ammo purchases here.  For the most part, it’s still the case.  Is it worth asking about, sure?  But is it […]

  2. […] Gee, it’s almost like this question was asked & answered almost a year ago.  And then when the Social Security Administration story came up, it was asked & answered again. […]

  3. […] has been done a few times here, addressing the initial 450 million rounds of JHP, then addressing it with Social Security’s investigators, and then debunking it again, but the story of DHS’s millions and billions of rounds keeps […]

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